Speakers

Here is a sneak preview of some of the speakers confirmed for the conference. Visit this website again for a complete list of confirmed speakers and speaker bios in the coming weeks.

Caroline Ajo-Franklin Caroline Ajo-Franklin
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Dr. Caroline Ajo-Franklin is a Staff Scientist at LBNL’s Molecular Foundry. Her research explores and engineers the interface between living organisms and non-living materials at the nanoscale. By programming processes such as electron transfer and biomineralization, she seeks to enable cells to electronically communicate with electrodes and to control the synthesis of inorganic materials. Ultimately, her work aims to create a new class of smart, self-renewing materials based on genetically reconfigured living cells seamlessly integrated with human-made components. Dr. Ajo-Franklin received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Stanford University and was a post-doctoral fellow in Systems Biology with Prof. Pam Silver at Harvard Medical School. Her research at the Molecular Foundry was recently profiled on the website Physorg.com, highlighted in Nature, and featured in the New & Notable Session at the 55th Annual Biophysical Society Meeting. SB5.0 Program Team

Faisal Aldaye Faisal Aldaye
Harvard Medical School
In 2008, Dr. Faisal Aldaye became a Research Fellow with Professor Pamela Silver at the Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, where he is applying the principles of DNA nanotechnology to a number of problems in synthetic biology. He received a B.Sc. in Chemistry from Dalhousie University and a Ph.D. in DNA nanotechnology from McGill University. His achievements have been recognized with numerous national and international awards, including the IUPAC Prize for Young Chemists and the Governor General's Gold Medal. He is currently a Canada NSERC Scholar. What's Next? Part I
Fri Jun 17
8:00-9:00
Luke Alphey Luke Alphey
Oxitec, Ltd and Oxford University
Dr. Luke Alphey is the Chief Scientist at Oxitec Ltd. Oxitec is developing innovative technology to control insect pests, based on the use of engineered sterile males of the pest insect species (‘RIDL® males’). These insects carry a simple genetic circuit imparting conditional (repressible) lethality. In the lab – or factory –provision of tetracycline allows the insects to thrive. On release into the wild, the males mate wild female insects, which lay eggs that are unable to develop into adults, due to inheritance of the control circuit and the absence of the repressor ‘antidote’. In 2006 Oxitec, with USDA, achieved the first open field releases of a GM insect for pest control. In 2009 and 2010, in collaboration with the Cayman Islands government, the first GM mosquito experiments were conducted showing that RIDL male mosquitoes could indeed find, mate with and suppress a wild mosquito population. Subsequent releases have been conducted in Malaysia and Brazil. Dr. Alphey’s earlier career focused on basic science, using Drosophila as a model system, latterly at Oxford University where he is now a Visiting Professor. He has published extensively in the field of insect genetic engineering and contributed to the development of international regulations. Dr. Alphey was selected as a Technology Pioneer of the World Economic Forum in 2008. Applications of Synthetic Biology
Thurs Jun 16
2:00-3:30
Adam Arkin Adam Arkin
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Dr. Adam Arkin is Director of the Synthetic Biology Institute and of the Physical Biosciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is the Dean A. Richard Newton Memorial Professor in UC Berkeley’s Department of Bioengineering. He is also co-director of the Virtual Institute of Microbial Stress and Survival, director of bioinformatics at the Joint Bioenergy Institute, and co-director of BIOFAB (International Open Facility Advancing Biotechnology). His research centers on uncovering the evolutionary design principles of cellular networks and populations and exploiting them for applications. He and colleagues are developing a framework to facilitate applications in health, the environment, and bioenergy by combining comparative functional genomics, quantitative measurement of cellular dynamics, biophysical modeling of cellular networks, and cellular circuit design. A member of the UC Berkeley faculty since 1999, he earned his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was named a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology in 2007 and, and has been profiled in Time Magazine as a “future innovator. Genome Scale Engineering
Wed Jun 15
8:00-9:30
Travis Bayer Travis Bayer
Imperial College London
Dr. Travis Bayer is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) at Imperial College London as part of the Division of Molecular Bioscience and the Centre for Synthetic Biology and Innovation. The Bayer lab is interested in rewiring biochemical networks, interfacing living and non-living systems, and using biological technologies to enhance global health and sustainability. Prior to joining Imperial, Travis did his BS at the University of Texas at Austin, PhD at Caltech and postdoctoral work at the University of California, San Francisco. Lightning Talks
Wed Jun 15
5:00-6:00
Steven Benner Steven Benner
Westheimer Institute for Science and Technology
Dr. Steven A. Benner is a Distinguished Fellow at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution and The Westheimer Institute of Science & Technology, which he co-founded. His research spans many fields in the physical sciences and natural history. His early work in synthetic biology generated, in 1984, the first synthetic gene encoding an enzyme, strategies for the total synthesis of genes, a redesigned DNA that incorporates twelve nucleotides, expanded genetic systems that encode proteins with more than 20 amino acids, nanostructures that exploit these, and some of the first designed enzymes. From these, his laboratory has constructed artificial chemical systems capable of supporting Darwinian evolution and tools that today help personalize the care of some 400,000 patients annually. His laboratory also helped found the field of paleogenetics, which resurrects ancestral genes and proteins from extinct organisms for study in the laboratory, providing strategies to test historical hypotheses throughout basic and biomedical research and in fields such as mammalian reproduction, hypertension, and alcoholism. In collaboration with Gaston Gonnet, the Benner laboratory developed evolutionary bioinformatics as a field, completing in 1990 the first exhaustive matching of a modern genomic sequence database, developing advanced models for patterns of sequence divergence in genes and proteins, coupling bioinformatics models for protein divergence with protein function, and providing the first successful tools to predict protein folds from sequence data alone. This work also marketed the first evolutionary organized genomic database, the MasterCatalog. He is the author of approximately 300 scientific publications and patents, and three books. Understanding the Path of Evolution
Fri Jun 17
9:30-11:30
Jef Boeke Jef Boeke
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Dr. Jef Boeke trained at Rockefeller University (Ph.D.) and the Whitehead Institute (postdoc). He is Professor of Molecular Biology & Genetics and Founding Director of the High Throughput Biology Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research interests lie in yeast genetics and genomics, with an emphasis on tool development, eukaryotic transposable element biology, and chromatin. He founded the “High Throughput Biology Center” or HIT Center, an interdisciplinary Center. The HiT Center contains advanced core facilities at JHU, Proteomics, DNA sequencing, Microarray and Chemcore, a robotics and compound screening unit. Dr. Boeke, together with colleagues Joel Bader and Srinivasan Chandrasegaran, leads the Sc2.0 synthetic yeast genome project, and created the course "Build A Genome". Genome Scale Engineering
Wed Jun 15
8:00-9:30
Matthias Bujara Matthias Bujara
ETH Zurich
Matthias Bujara is currently completing his graduate studies in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at the ETH Zurich in the lab of Dr. Sven Panke. He received his diploma in biotechnology from the TU Braunschweig in Germany, working with Professor Petra Dersch. He has also conducted oncology and biotechnology research at Nycomed GmbH (Konstantz, Germany) and the University of Waterloo (Canada). His current research interest involves developing new routes for chemo- and biocatalysis. His PhD thesis addresses the recruitment and optimization of multi-enzyme systems for the production of fine chemical building blocks starting from the cheap carbon source glucose. Lightning Talks
Wed Jun 15
5:00-6:00
Darlene Cavalier Darlene Cavalier
ScienceCheerleader.com and Discover Magazine
Darlene Cavalier is the founder of ScienceCheerleader.com, a blog that promotes the involvement of citizens in science and science-related policy. Cavalier held executive positions at Walt Disney Publishing and worked at Discover magazine for more than a decade. She ran a $1.5 million NSF grant to promote basic research through partnerships with Disney and ABC TV and collaborated with the NSF, NBC Sports, and the NFL to produce the Science of NFL Football series. Cavalier is a contributing editor and senior advisor at Discover Magazine and is the cofounder of ScienceForCitizens.net, a website that connects the public to citizen science projects. Avenues for Education About Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Michelle Chang Michelle Chang
UC Berkeley
Dr. Michelle Chang is an assistant professor at UC Berkeley in the Departments of Chemistry and Molecular and Cell Biology. She received her Ph.D. from MIT, working with JoAnne Stubbe and Daniel Nocera, and her postdoctoral training with Jay Keasling at UC Berkeley. Her research group works at the interface of enzymology and synthetic biology, with a focus on studying biological fluorine chemistry, formation of mixed-valent nanomaterials by directional-sensing bacteria, and processes involved in developing synthetic biofuel pathways. She has received the Dreyfus New Faculty Award, TR35 Award, Beckman Young Investigator Award, NSF CAREER Award, and Agilent Early Career Award. Learn By Building: Elements & Architecture
Fri Jun 17
2:00-3:30
Siyuan Chen
Agilent Technologies
DNA Assembly Methods-Workshop
Wed Jun 15
12:00-2:00
King Chow King Lau Chow
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Dr. King L. Chow, Professor of Life Science at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, earned his PhD in Cell Biology from Baylor College of Medicine. He completed his postdoctoral training in Albert Einstein College of Medicine and joined HKUST afterwards. He rose to the current rank in the following decade and he concurrently holds positions of Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education, Director of the Molecular Biomedical Sciences Program and Associate Director of the Bioengineering Program at HKUST. His research work is set on a platform using model organisms and spans from molecular genetics, neural developmental biology to evolutionary biology. He chaired the local organizing committee of the Synthetic Biology 4.0 Conference in 2008, which brought synthetic biology to Hong Kong. He will lead the organization of the iGEM Asia regional competition this year. Prof. Chow is active in teaching broad areas in life science disciplines and general science education. He has taught a dozen different undergraduate and postgraduate courses in HKUST and CUHK, led various student competitions, earning him the School of Science Teaching Award and the Michael G. Gale Medal of distinguished teaching at HKUST. He is active in course and curriculum development and has served as the chair of curriculum committees at HKUST and other local institutions. Avenues for Education About Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Linda Chrisey Linda Chrisey
Office of Naval Research
Dr. Linda A. Chrisey has been a program officer at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) since 1998, where she is currently the lead for ONR’s Team Bio as well as manager for research programs spanning several areas, including Synthetic Biology, Microbial Fuel Cells and Bioenergy, Marine Biofouling, and Biomedical Sensors. Prior to joining ONR, Dr. Chrisey joined the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), as a research chemist. Her research activities included the development of a research program utilizing DNA as a biomaterial, and other applications of DNA in biosensors. She has published >25 research papers which have been cited over 1250 times. Dr. Chrisey’s education and training includes a B.S. from SUNY Binghamton (Biochemistry, 1983), a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia (Bio-Organic Chemistry, 1988), and a postdoctoral position at the National Institutes of Health in heterocyclic chemistry. Following her postdoc she joined a small biotechnology company, SYNTHECELL Corp., in 1989 where she served as a Senior Scientist for Antisense DNA Research Development. Dr. Chrisey currently serves as the DOD representative to the US-EC Task Force on Biotechnology, and also represented the Navy to the DOD Strategic Environmental Research and Development/Environmental Security Technology Certification Programs from 2000-2010. She has assisted DARPA, NSF, and the NOAA Sea Grant Marine Biotechnology Program with reviews and technical advice, as well providing technical reviews for several scientific journals (Langmuir, Biophysical Journal, Biotechniques, Nucleic Acids Research). Dr. Chrisey was named a DOD Women’s History Month STEM Role Model (2006), and several performance, research and patent awards from ONR and NRL. What Do We Need from Synthetic Biology?-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
George Church George Church
Harvard Medical School
Dr. George Church is Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Center for Computational Genetics. With degrees from Duke University in Chemistry and Zoology, he co-authored research on 3D-software & RNA structure with Sung-Hou Kim. His PhD from Harvard in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology with Wally Gilbert included the first direct genomic sequencing method in 1984; initiating the Human Genome Project then as a Research Scientist at newly-formed Biogen Inc. and a Monsanto Life Sciences Research Fellow at UCSF with Gail Martin. He invented the broadly-applied concepts of molecular multiplexing and tags, homologous recombination methods, and array DNA synthesizers. Technology transfer of automated sequencing & software to Genome Therapeutics Corp. resulted in the first commercial genome sequence (the human pathogen, H. pylori, 1994). This multiplex solid-phase sequencing evolved into polonies (1999), ABI-SOLiD (2005) & open-source Polonator.org (2007) and Personal Genomes.org. He has served in advisory roles for 12 journals (including Nature Molecular Systems Biology), 5 granting agencies and 24 biotech companies (e.g. 23andme & recently founding Codon Devices, Knome and LS9). Current research focuses on integrating biosystems-modeling with Personal Genomics & synthetic biology. Next Generation Techniques
Wed Jun 15
10:00-11:30
Kevin Costa Kevin Costa
SynBERC
Kevin Costa is the Administrative Director of the Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center (SynBERC), a multi-university effort to help lay the foundation for synthetic biology and train a new cadre of bio-engineers. Kevin has been involved in strategic planning at Berkeley Lab, operations management in the software development sector, and medical writing. His interests include science communication, data systems for research management, science policy, and the social considerations of synthetic biology. What Do We Need from Synthetic Biology?-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Douglas Densmore Douglas Densmore
Boston University
Dr. Douglas Densmore received his Bachelors of Science in Engineering (Computer Engineering) from the University of Michigan in April 2001. He received his Masters of Science in Electrical Engineering in May 2004 and his PhD in Electrical Engineering in May 2007 (both from UC Berkeley). After receiving his PhD he was a UC Chancellor’s post doctoral researcher both at UC Berkeley and the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI). He was the team leader of UC Berkeley’s award winning software tools team for MIT’s International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition (iGEM) in 2008 and 2009. His industry experience includes four+ summers with Intel Corporation and summer research positions at Cypress Semiconductor and Xilinx Research Labs. He is currently a member of the Gigascale Systems Research Center (GSRC), the Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS), and the Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center (SynBERC). He is now the Richard and Minda Reidy Family Career Development Assistant Professor at Boston University in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is the leader of the Center for Integrating Design Automation Research (CIDAR) and a member of the Center for Advanced Biotechnology (CAB). His background and interests are in Computer Architecture, Embedded Systems, Logic Synthesis, Digital Logic Design, System Level Design, and Synthetic Biology. Software Tools for Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Fri Jun 17
12:00-2:00
Maitreya Dunham Maitreya Dunham
University of Washington
Dr. Maitreya Dunham is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington. Her lab studies genome evolution in yeasts from a novel genomics perspective, a topic that she has been interested in since her PhD work at Stanford and as a Lewis-Sigler Fellow at Princeton. To this end, we use experimental evolution and comparative genomics to investigate how genomes evolve on timecourses from a few weeks to millions of years. The lab is also currently working on a variety of related technology development projects, ranging from instrument development for parallelized strain cultivation to applications of next generation sequencing for high throughput functional studies of natural variation. For more information, visit her web site. Understanding the Path of Evolution
Fri Jun 17
9:30-11:30
Jonathan Eisen Jonathan Eisen
UC Davis and PLoS Biology
Dr. Jonathan Eisen is a professor in the Genome Center at the University of California, Davis. His research focuses on the mechanisms underlying the origin of novelty (how new processes and functions originate). Most of his work involves the use of high- throughput DNA sequencing methods to characterize microbes and then the use and development of computational methods to analyze this type of data. In particular, his computational work has focused on integrating evolutionary analysis with genome analysis—so-called phylogenomics. Previously, he applied this phylogenomic approach to cultured organisms, such as those from extreme environments and those with key properties as they relate to evolution or global climate cycles. Currently he is using sequencing and phylogenomic methods to study microbes directly in their natural habitats (i.e., without culturing). In particular he focuses on how communities of microbes interact with each other or with plant and animal hosts to create new functions. Dr. Eisen is also coordinating one of the largest microbial genome sequencing projects to date—the “Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea” being done at the Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute, where he holds an Adjunct Appointment. In addition to his research, Dr. Eisen is also a vocal advocate for “open access” to scientific publications and is the Academic Editor-in-Chief of PLoS Biology. He is also an active and award-winning blogger/microblogger (e.g., phylogenomics.blogspot.com and twitter.com/phylogenomics). Prior to moving to UC Davis he was on the faculty of The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville, Maryland. He earned his Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University, where he worked on the evolution of DNA repair processes in the lab of Philip C. Hanawalt and his undergraduate degree in biology from Harvard College Avenues for Education About Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Mark Fischer Mark Fischer
Duane Morris LLP
Mark A. Fischer is a Partner at Duane Morris LLP, based in Boston. His law practice is focused on solving problems and making deals for innovative companies, institutions, and individuals. Mr. Fischer’s clients are typically in the creative industries, such as new media, social networking, ,science, technology, software, new media, entertainment, and publishing. He has particular expertise in licensing, open source, copyright, and trademarks. He has considerable experience in intellectual property litigation, mediation, and arbitration. Mr. Fischer teaches Advanced Copyright at Suffolk University Law School. Wetware Tools for Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Fri Jun 17
12:00-2:00
Martin Fussenegger Martin Fussenegger
ETH Zurich
Dr. Martin Fussenegger is professor of biotechnology and bioengineering at the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering in Basel (D-BSSE) of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, the ETH Zurich. In 1992 he graduated in molecular biology and genetics with Werner Arber at the Biocenter in Basel, joined the Max Planck Institute of Biology for his Ph.D. thesis in medical microbiology (1993-1994) and continued his studies on host-pathogen interactions at the Max Planck Institute of Infection Biology as a postdoctoral fellow (1995). In 1996, he joined the research unit of James E. Bailey at the ETH Institute of Biotechnology as an independent group leader where he refocused his research on mammalian cell engineering, a topic for which he received his habilitation in 2000. In 2002 he became Swiss National Science Foundation professor of molecular biotechnology at the ETH Institute of Biotechnology prior to being awarded a chair in biotechnology and bioengineering at the ETH Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering (2004). Since 2006, Dr. Fussenegger is director of studies of the ETH biotechnology curriculum and director of the ETH Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering. Dr. Fussenegger has published over 165 refereed research papers, is coinventor of several patents, Vice-Chairman of the European Society for Animal Cell Technology (ESACT), editor of the Journal of Biotechnology, editorial board member of Cell Engineering and Biotechnology & Bioengineering and cofounder of the biotechnology startup companies Cistronics Cell Technology GmbH and Cistronics Antiinfectives AG. For his contributions to drug discovery and cell engineering, Dr. Fussenegger received the de Vigier and the Elmar Gaden Awards in 2003, became a member of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering in 2007 and was the first non-US recipient of the Merck Award in Cell Engineering in 2008. Plants, Agriculture & the Environment
Thurs Jun 16
10:30-11:30
Justin Gallivan Justin Gallivan
Emory University
Dr. Justin Gallivan received his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1994. From there, he headed west to Caltech where he performed high-precision studies on the structure and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with Dennis Dougherty in the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and in collaboration with Henry Lester in the Division of Biology. After receiving his Ph.D. in 2000, Justin remained at Caltech as an NIH postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Bob Grubbs where he worked on the development of new organometallic catalysts. In the summer of 2002, Justin began his independent career as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Emory University, where his lab is broadly interested in using reprogramming organisms to carry out complex tasks. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 2008. Justin has won several awards for his research, including a Research Innovation Award from the Research Corporation, a Beckman Young Investigator Award from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation, a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship. When not in the lab, Justin can often be found in the kitchen, where he cooks reasonably well, or on the golf course, where he is reminded that he shouldn’t quit his day job. Plants, Agriculture & the Environment
Thurs Jun 16
10:30-11:30
Dan Gibson Dan Gibson
J. Craig Venter Institute
Dr. Daniel Gibson is a Principal Scientist in the Synthetic Biology group at Synthetic Genomics, Inc. and an Associate Professor at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). Since joining the JCVI as a postdoc in 2004, Gibson led the JCVI efforts to synthesize two complete bacterial genomes. Those projects resulted in creation of the first synthetic bacterial cell and development of an enabling suite of DNA synthesis and assembly methods. Prior to joining the JCVI, Gibson earned his Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of Southern California. While there, he used yeast as the model system for studying cell cycle surveillance mechanisms (checkpoints), which are significant in our understanding of cancer development. Before earning his Ph.D., he earned his Bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Gibson joined SGI in February 2011. DNA Assembly Methods-Workshop
Wed Jun 15
12:00-2:00
John Glass John Glass
J. Craig Venter Institute
Dr. John Glass is a Professor in the JCVI Synthetic Biology Group in Rockville, MD. Glass is part of the Venter Institute team that recently announced the creation of a synthetic bacterial cell. In reaching this milestone the Venter Institute scientists developed the fundamental techniques of the new field of synthetic genomics including genome transplantation and genome assembly. His expertise is in molecular biology, microbial pathogenesis, and microbial genomics. At the JCVI he led the mycoplasma minimal genome, and genome transplantation projects, and has been a key scientist in environmental genomics and viral metagenomics work. Glass and his Venter Institute colleagues are now using these and new synthetic genomics approaches to create cells and organelles with redesigned genomes to make microbes that can produce biofuels, pharmaceuticals, and industrially valuable molecules. Additionally, Glass is leading a Venter Institute effort that uses synthetic genomics methods to improve the speed of production and efficacy of influenza virus vaccines. Glass is also an adjunct faculty member of the University of Maryland at College Park Cellular and Molecular Biology Program. Prior to joining the JCVI Dr. Glass spent five years in the Infectious Diseases Research Division of the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly. There he directed a Hepatitis C virology group and a microbial genomics group (1998-2003). Glass earned his undergraduate (biology) and graduate degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His Ph.D. work was on RNA virus genetics in the laboratory of Gail Wertz. He was on the faculty and did postdoctoral fellowships in the Microbiology Department of the University of Alabama at Birmingham in polio virology with Casey Morrow and mycoplasma pathogenesis with Gail Cassell (1990-1998). On sabbatical leave in Ellson Chen’s lab at Applied Biosystems Inc.(1995-1997) he sequenced the genome of Ureaplasma parvum and began his study mycoplasma genomics. Genome Scale Engineering
Wed Jun 15
8:00-9:30
Theresa Good Theresa Good
U.S. National Science Foundation
Dr. Theresa Good is currently a tenured Professor in the department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and the Director of the Biotechnology, Biochemical and Biomass Engineering Program, in the Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems at the National Science Foundation. She received her MS in Chemical Engineering at Cornell University in 1985 and her PhD in Chemical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1996. In between her MS and PhD she held a number of industrial and academic positions, including 2 years as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching biology and chemistry in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since 1996 she has held faculty positions at Texas A&M and UMBC. She has advised 15 PhD students, 5 of whom are in currently Assistant or Associate Professors in universities through out the world. The others are in a variety of postdoctoral and industrial research/engineering positions in the US. Her research expertise is in the area of protein aggregation and disease, developing in vitro models of neurodegenerative diseases, and other areas of cellular engineering. In 2010, she became a Program Director at the National Science Foundation, where she reviews approximately 300 proposals a year in the areas of systems biology, protein engineering, cellular and metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, stems cells and tissue engineering. She also manages two engineering centers in Synthetic Biology and Neural Engineering, and manages an Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation program in engineering multicellular and interkingdom signaling. What Do We Need from Synthetic Biology?-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Jeff Gore Jeff Gore
MIT
Dr. Jeff Gore is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His biophysics laboratory studies evolutionary dynamics and quantitative ecology by combining microbial experiments with ideas from physics, mathematics, and economics. As a Pappalardo Postdoctoral Fellow in the MIT Physics Department, he used approaches from game theory to understand how yeast cells cooperate to grow on the sugar sucrose, yielding insight into the conditions required for the evolution of cooperative behaviors. Jeff received his PhD at the University of California, Berkeley as a Hertz Fellow, where he developed new techniques to manipulate individual biological molecules. Jeff is a Sloan Foundation Fellow with additional funding from an NIH Pathways to Independence Award. Engineered and Natural Symbioses
Thurs Jun 16
9:30-10:30
Jeff Gralnick Jeff Gralnick
University of Minnesota
Dr. Jeffrey A. Gralnick has been an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities since 2005. His academic appointment is in the Department of Microbiology in the Medical School, but his office and lab reside in the BioTechnology Institute on the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus. He trained in classic bacterial genetics and physiology at the University of Wisconsin - Madison with Dr. Diana Downs. He joined Prof. Dianne Newman's research group in 2003 at Caltech as a postdoctoral fellow and has been working with Shewanella, the 'E. coli of the Environment,' ever since. The Gralnick Lab studies basic physiology of Shewanella and applied aspects of these amazing bacteria in the areas of biocatalysis, bioremediation and bioenergy. Living/Non-Living Interfaces
Thurs Jun 16
8:00-9:00
Nathan Hillson Nathan Hillson
Joint BioEnergy Institute
Dr. Nathan Hillson is the Director of Synthetic Biology at the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in Emeryville, California and Research Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In his current role at JBEI, Dr. Hillson coordinates and directs the development of the JBEI-ICE biological parts repository, the characterization and standardization of biological parts, the computer-aided design of biological pathways and circuits invoking the standardized parts, and the automated assembly of the pathways and incorporation thereof into microbial hosts such as E. coli and S. cerevisiae, towards the sustainable production of clean biofuels. Dr. Hillson received his Ph.D. in Biophysics from Harvard Medical School. DNA Assembly Methods-Workshop
Wed Jun 15
12:00-2:00
Alicia Jackson Alicia Jackson
DARPA
Dr. Alicia Jackson joined the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in October 2010. Her interests include the integration of engineering with biology to assemble cells and inorganic materials, novel manufacturing processes for increased process versatility and resiliency in a combat environment, and biomanufacturing to create self-healing materials, evolvable processes, and otherwise ‘unmanufacturable’ materials. Dr. Jackson came to DARPA from the United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources where she served as a member of the Professional Staff. Her portfolio included Smart Grid, Grid Scale Energy Storage, National Competitiveness, Clean‐Energy Jobs, and Federal Energy R&D. Dr. Jackson received her PhD (2007) and SB (2002) in Materials Science and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. What Do We Need from Synthetic Biology?-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Alfonso Jaramillo Alfonso Jaramillo
Institute of Systems & Synthetic Biology, France
Dr. Alfonso Jaramillo is the leader of the Synth-Bio group at the Institute of Systems and Synthetic Biology (Genopole, France), where he holds a tenured research position since 2009. He received a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics from the University of Valencia (1999) and a Habilitation (biology) in 2007 from the U. Paris Sud XI (Orsay, France). He conducted postdoctoral research in computational biology at the Universite Libre de Bruxelles (1999-2002), Universite Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg (2002) and Harvard University (2003). In September 2003 he joined the biochemistry faculty of the Ecole Polytechnique as Maitre de Conferences, where he got tenured in 2005. He is qualified for French full-Professorship in Biophysics and in Molecular Biology sections (2007). He is member of the editorial board of 4 journals. He has published 47 refereed articles and conference proceedings. His group consists of 5 PhD students, 2 postdocs, 1 master student and 1 project manager. Platforms for Biological Design
Wed Jun 15
4:00-5:00
Heather Jensen Heather Jensen
LBNL
Heather Jensen is a graduate student in the Chemistry Department at UC Berkeley. She works jointly with Professor Jay Groves at UCB and Dr. Caroline Ajo-Franklin at LBNL’s Molecular Foundry. In her research, Jensen has engineered electrical connection in living cells. By programming live microbes for extracellular electron transfer, she seeks to build an electron conduit to enable electronic communication with inorganic materials. Jensen received her B.S. in Biochemistry from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, in 2007. Her research was recently profiled on the website Physorg.com, highlighted in Nature, and featured in the New & Notable Session at the 55th Annual Biophysical Society Meeting. What's Next? Part II
Fri Jun 17
4:00-5:00
Ellen Jorgensen Ellen Jorgensen
Genspace NYC and New York Medical College
Dr. Ellen D. Jorgensen is President and Scientific Program Director of Genspace NYC, a nonprofit organization dedicated to increasing science literacy in both student and adult populations, particularly in the areas of molecular and synthetic biology. She teaches courses and workshops in molecular and synthetic biology for the general public, and is involved in numerous collaborations with educational outreach organizations aimed at developing and implementing better science education at the middle school, high school, and undergraduate level. During this summer she will be the leading mentor of the Columbia University-Cooper Union 2011 iGEM team. Dr. Jorgensen received her Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the Sackler Institute at New York University School of Medicine in 1987, and went on to continue her research in protein structure/function at SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn. Since then she has held numerous positions in the biotechnology industry and biomedical research-based nonprofits. From 2001 to 2009 she was Director of Biomarker Discovery and Development at Vector Research, where she led a group searching for early biomarkers of tobacco-related lung disease. She is presently an adjunct faculty member at New York Medical College. Avenues for Education About Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Peter Karp
SRI
Software Tools for Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Fri Jun 17
12:00-2:00
Shunnichi Kashida Shunnichi Kashida
Kyoto University
Shunnichi Kashida is a Ph.D student in the Department of Biostudies at Kyoto University and serves as JSPS Research Fellow. He received his Bachelors of Science in Chemistry (Biochemistry) in March 2007, and his Masters of Science in Bio Engineering in March 2009, also from Kyoto University. His current research interest involves rewiring cellular signalling pathways and developing novel genetic switches triggered by intrinsic proteins. What's Next? Part II
Fri Jun 17
4:00-5:00
Tanja Kortemme Tanja Kortemme
University of California San Francisco
Dr. Tanja Kortemme is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) and the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3). She received her PhD from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, where she worked with Tom Creighton in the area of protein biophysics, and as a postdoc with Luis Serrano on protein folding and design. As a Human Frontiers Postdoctoral Fellow, she developed methods for the prediction and design of proteins and protein-protein interactions with David Baker at the University of Washington in Seattle, before joining UCSF as a faculty member in 2004. Her research centers on the simulation, quantitative characterization, design and engineering of protein interactions and networks. Her group is one of the main contributors to the ROSETTA software suite for structure-based protein modeling and design, and her lab is part of SynBERC (the Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center). Understanding the Path of Evolution
Fri Jun 17
9:30-11:30
Sri Kosuri Sriram Kosuri
Harvard Medical School
Dr. Sriram Kosuri is a postdoctoral fellow at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School in the laboratory of Prof. George Church. Dr. Kosuri is currently developing technologies to enable rapid and parallel methods to engineer natural organisms towards new functions. Prior to the Wyss Institute, he was the first employee at Joule Biotechnologies, a startup company trying to develop fuels from sunlight using engineered microbes. He completed his Sc.D. in Prof. Drew Endy's lab at MIT, where he worked on the development of engineered bacterial viruses. Also during this time, he co-founded OpenWetWare, a website dedicated to the sharing of information in the biological sciences. Genome Scale Engineering
Wed Jun 15
8:00-9:30
Natalie Kuldell Natalie Kuldell
MIT
Dr. Natalie Kuldell teaches in the Department of Biological Engineering at MIT. She develops discovery-based curricula drawn from the current literature to engage undergraduate students in structured, reasonably authentic laboratory and project-based experiences. She is also the director of a web-based resource called BioBuilder.org that offers animations, classroom/lab activities and online forums to teach synthetic biology in late high school/early college settings. She completed her doctoral and post-doctoral work at Harvard Medical School, and taught at Wellesley College before joining the faculty at MIT. Avenues for Education About Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Daniel Larson Daniel Larson
U.S. National Cancer Institute
The primary goal of Dr. Dan Larson's laboratory at the National Cancer Institute is to understand gene expression in eukaryotic cells, starting from the mechanistic behavior of individual macromolecules and proceeding to their regulation in cells and tissue. The laboratory utilizes a battery of biophysical and molecular approaches, including single-molecule microscopy, multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation analysis, RNA visualization in fixed and living cells, and computational modeling of dynamic gene regulation. Dr. Larson was trained in biophysics, receiving a PhD from Cornell University working in the laboratory of Watt W. Webb. During this time, he developed a range of optical methods for interrogating macromolecular interactions in living cells. As a joint postdoctoral fellow in the laboratories of Robert Singer and John Condeelis, he helped pioneer in vivo single molecule studies of transcription. Currently, the lab focuses on the regulation and function of RNA in a cell-biological context, including transcription, splicing, post-transcriptional processing, and decay. The large and ever-growing catalog of cellular RNAs and their multiple roles in gene regulation and disease progression makes this field an exciting and dynamic area of research Lightning Talks
Wed Jun 15
5:00-6:00
Anselm Levskaya
Stanford University
Living/Non-Living Interfaces
Thurs Jun 16
8:00-9:00
Julius Lucks Julius Lucks
Cornell University
Dr. Julius Lucks is an Assistant Professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University. He received his PhD in Chemical Physics from Harvard University, and was a Miller Fellow in the laboratory of Adam Arkin at the University of California at Berkeley. With Lei Qi and Adam Arkin, he engineered versatile RNA-sensing transcriptional regulators that can be easily reconfigured to independently regulate multiple genes, logically control gene expression, and propagate signals as RNA molecules in gene networks. He also lead the team that developed SHAPE-Seq, an experimental technique that utilizes next generation sequencing for probing RNA secondary and tertiary structures of hundreds of RNAs in a single experiment. At Cornell, his group combines advances in next generation sequencing and RNA biology to research the design principles for the bottom-up construction of sophisticated gene networks with predictable function. SB5.0 Program Team

Filippo Menolascina Filippo Menolascina
TIGEM, Italy
Filippo Menolascina was born in Bari (Italy) in 1984 and was awarded a ‘‘Laurea cum Laude’’ degree in Computer Engineering (M.Eng.) from the Technical University of Bari in 2008. His main research topics include the application of control systems engineering principles in systems and synthetic biology and the development of integrated microfluidic platforms for gene regulatory networks identification. In 2009 he joined Jeff Hasty’s Lab at UCSD as visiting scholar. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. under the supervision of Diego and Mario di Bernardo at the TeleThon Institute of Genetics and Medicine in Naples, Italy. What's Next? Part II
Fri Jun 17
4:00-5:00
Ilona Miko Ilona Miko
Nature Education
Dr. Ilona Miko is Senior Scientific editor for Life Sciences at Nature Education, the educational division of Nature Publishing Group. She earned her B.A. in Biology from Barnard College, Columbia University, and her Ph.D in Neural Science from New York University. She joined Nature Education after completing a postdoctoral fellowship at UC Irvine and 10 full years of bench research. This research was primarily focused on physiological mechanisms supporting acoustic function in the brain and the genetic control of brain circuit development (structure and function). Her experience also includes three years in the biotech industry, at Genentech and Berlex Biosciences (now Bayer), where she focused on immune function in neurological disease. In addition to her contributions to Scitable, Ilona has written and edited a wide range of scientific material, from textbooks to research publications. Ilona has a strong interest in science education and promoting the public understanding of science. She is enthusiastic about developing evidence-based learning methods that enliven scientific curricula. Avenues for Education About Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Holly Million Holly Million
BioBricks Foundation
Holly Million has been a nonprofit management consultant for two decades, working for such organizations as Interplast, SFJAZZ, KTEH Public Television, Goodwill, Amnesty International, and others. Million is a staunch champion of democracy and the common good who has dedicated her life to the nonprofit sector. As a consultant, teacher, writer, and filmmaker, Million has educated and empowered people to solve problems and make the world a better place. At the BioBricks Foundation, Million’s focus has been to help shape the organization as a force to promote biotechnology in the public interest. For 15 years, Million is also a professional filmmaker and producer. Million has an MA in education from Stanford University and a BA in English from Harvard University.
Vivek Mutalik Vivek Mutalik
BIOFAB
Dr. Vivek K. Mutalik is a team leader in the BIOFAB: International Open Facility Advancing Biotechnology, the world's first biological design-build facility launched under the leadership of Profs. Adam Arkin, Drew Endy and Jay Keasling. Dr. Mutalik is currently working on Generalized Expression Operating Systems that will be useful for designing and programming gene expression in a predictable manner at genome-scale engineering efforts. He is also directly responsible for managing the efforts in designing, building, and testing a collection of engineered genetic components that control constitutive RNA production, RNA processing and degradation, translation initiation, protein degradation and DNA replication. The BioFab projects are designed to produce broadly useful collections of standard biological parts that can be made freely available to both academic and commercial users, while also enabling the rapid design and prototyping of genetic constructs. Currently BioFAB is located in Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) premises, Emeryville, California. Prior to joining BioFAB, Dr, Mutalik worked with Prof. Arkin as a project scientist in the Technology Division of JBEI, where he designed a library of orthogonal and function predictable RNA regulators. He received his PhD from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, in Mumbai, India where he worked with Prof. Venkatesh in the area of computational systems biology and as a postdoc with Prof Carol Gross at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) on promoter characterization and promoter strength prediction modeling of alternative sigma factor regulon in E coli. He also has more than three years of fermentation and bulk drug manufacturing experience in the Biotechnology Industry. Wetware Tools for Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Fri Jun 17
12:00-2:00
Trent Northen Trent Northen
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Dr. Trent Northen is a Staff Scientist at both the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and PI at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. His research group is focused on developing and implementing mass spectrometry based technologies for studying metabolism. He is the inventor of Nanostructure-Inititator Mass Spectrometry the most sensitive mass spectrometry approach which has now been extended to high throughput enzyme assays, metabolite screening and tissue imaging application. He obtained his BS in Chemical Engineering (UCSB), PhD in Chemistry (Biodesign Institute ASU, Neal Woodbury) and was a post-doctoral fellow in the lab of Gary Siuzdak (The Scripps Research Institute). He is the recipient of several awards including, NSF IGERT fellowship, Innovator of the year (AzTE), IDEA award (CA BCRP), NIH career development award, Presidential Early Career in Science and Engineering (2009, Obama) and holds several patents. Next Generation Techniques
Wed Jun 15
10:00-11:30
Todd Peterson Todd Peterson
Life Technologies
Dr. Todd Peterson is currently Vice President of Synthetic Biology R&D at Life Technologies, the leading life science research tools and systems company, with headquarters in Carlsbad California. Dr. Peterson has over 20 years experience in industrial research and development in the areas of molecular biology, nucleic acids and genomics product and technology development. His experience encompasses clinical diagnostics, life science research products and pharmaceutical discovery technologies and market segments. Managing a global team of scientists, Dr. Peterson’s team is currently focused upon development and commercialization of tools and technologies to accelerate synthetic biology research, development and applications. Prior to joining Life Technologies/Invitrogen in 2003, Dr. Peterson held research and development positions at Genicon Sciences, Trega Biosciences, Hybritech and Gen-Probe where his primary responsibilities focused on assay development and new technologies research. Dr. Peterson was a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute in Cologne Germany and received his Ph.D. in Microbiology at the University of Southern California School of Medicine. What Do We Need from Synthetic Biology?-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Lei Qi Lei Qi
University of Calfornia Berkeley
Lei Qi is a Ph.D. candidate at the joint UC Berkeley-UCSF graduate program in Bioengineering under the supervision of Dr. Adam Arkin. His research focuses on engineering scalable transcript-level genetic systems using non-coding RNA molecules. Based on natural RNA regulations, he and his co-workers are engineering mutually orthogonal RNA molecules that can both independently sense user-defined cellular molecules, and collectively form network modules inside the same cell. By integrating these two distinct capabilities of RNA molecules, they aim to demonstrate non-coding RNAs as a useful toolbox to facilitate the bottom-up construction of scalable genetic architectures for controlling gene expression. What's Next? Part II
Fri Jun 17
4:00-5:00
Eva Schmid Eva Schmid
University of Calfornia Berkeley
Dr. Eva Schmid is a Miller Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley where she works with Dan Fletcher in the Department of Bioengineering. Eva has an undergraduate degree in Microbiology from the University of Vienna, Austria. Her master thesis investigated aspects of the molecular biology of common cold viruses. Later she moved to the University of Cambridge, UK, where she did a PhD at the MRC-LMB (Medical Research Council – Laboratory of Molecular Biology) with Harvey McMahon focusing on biochemical networks in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Now, in Berkeley, she collaborates with a team of engineers and physicists to synthetically to reconstitute ‘cell-like’ behaviors. What's Next? Part I
Fri Jun 17
8:00-9:00
Markus Schmidt Markus Schmidt
IDC/Biofaction
Dr. Markus Schmidt is a researcher at IDC and the CEO of Biofaction. He has an educational background in electronic engineering, biology and environmental risk assessment. In the last 10 years he has carried out environmental risk assessment, safety and public perception studies in a number of science and technolog fields (GM-crops, nanotechnology, converging technologies, and synthetic biology). He served as an advisor to several bioethics councils in the US and Europe. In addition to his research work, Markus Schmidt contributes to a better interaction between science and society, through public talks, production of scientific documentary flms, the organisation of the Synthetic Biology - Science, Art and Film Festival "Bio:Fiction", and the art/science exhibition "synth-ethic". Interacting with Society
Thurs Jun 16
4:00-5:30
Petra Schwille Petra Schwille
Technische Universitat Dresden
Dr. Petra Schwille is professor of biophysics at the TU Dresden, Germany. She studied physics and philosophy, graduated in 1993, and performed her PhD research until 1996 at the Max Planck Institute for biophysical chemistry in Göttingen. After two years of postdoctoral fellowship at Cornell University (USA), she became independent group leader at the MPI in Göttingen in 1999, from where she moved to Dresden in 2002. Her fields of interest are single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy, cell and membrane biophysics, and since a couple of years, synthetic biology of minimal systems. Her interest is to reconstitute and characterize key features of biological self-organization from the bottom up. She has published over 200 articles and received a number of prizes, most recently the Leibniz prize of the German research foundation DFG in 2010. She is member of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. Physics and Energetics of Molecular Systems
Wed Jun 15
2:00-3:30
Judy Scitchmoor Judy Scotchmoor
University of Calfornia Berkeley
Judy Scotchmoor received her BS in Biological Sciences from UC Berkeley in 1966 and her Secondary Teaching Credential from Hayward State University the following year. After 25 years of teaching math and science to 7th and 8th graders, Judy returned to her alma mater and is now Assistant Director of the UC Museum of Paleontology, in charge of Education and Public Outreach. With her experience in the classroom, it is not unusual that among her many roles at the museum, her primary interest is in the use of paleontology and technology as vehicles for improving science education in the classroom. Judy is currently the Project Coordinator of three NSF-funded programs – Understanding Evolution, Understanding Science, and the Paleontology Portal. She is editor and co-author of three resource books for teachers, "Learning from the Fossil Record", "Evolution: Investigating the Evidence", and "Dinosaurs: the Science behind the Stories. Judy was the recipient of the 2004 Joseph T. Gregory Award for outstanding service to the welfare of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, the 2006 recipient of the Education Award presented by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, and was elected as a AAAS Fellow in 2009 for her leadership in defending the teaching of evolution and quality science education. Avenues for Education About Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Thurs Jun 16
12:00-2:00
Matthew Scott Matthew Scott
University of Waterloo
Dr. Matthew Scott is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and the Department of Chemistry at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. After an undergraduate degree in Chemistry at the University of Calgary, and a PhD in Applied Mathematics at the University of Waterloo, Dr. Scott took up a post-doctoral position in the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics at the University of California at San Diego. In the microbiology lab of Terry Hwa, quantitative analysis of Escherichia coli under various modes of growth inhibition led to the formulation of several empirical correlations between growth rate and macromolecular cell composition, called the ‘growth laws.’ Physics and Energetics of Molecular Systems
Wed Jun 15
2:00-3:30
Zach Serber
Amyris
Wetware Tools for Synthetic Biology-Workshop
Fri Jun 17
12:00-2:00
Yue Shen Yue Shen
Beijing Genomics Institute, Shenzhen
Yue (Chantal) Shen is the Leader of the Synthetic Biology Unit of the Beijing Genomics Institute, Shenzhen. She received her Masters degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Melbourne. Her work focuses on metagenomic sequencing, assembly, and characterization of genes found in the human intestinal tract. She also leads international cooperative projects, including the E. coli Central Dogma Project with the BIOFAB and the SC2.0 Project with Johns Hopkins University. Engineered and Natural Symbioses
Thurs Jun 16
9:30-10:30
Reshma Shetty Reshma Shetty
Ginkgo Bioworks
Dr. Reshma Shetty graduated from MIT with a PhD in Biological Engineering in 2008 during which she worked on building digital logic in cells. Reshma has been active in synthetic biology for several years and co-organized SB1.0, the first international conference in synthetic biology in 2004. Her coolest genetically engineered machine to date was engineering E. coli to smell like mint and bananas. In 2008, Forbes magazine named Reshma one of Eight People Inventing the Future and in 2011, Fast Company named her one of 100 Most Creative People in Business. Reshma and colleagues have founded synthetic biology startup Ginkgo BioWorks, Inc. whose mission is to make biology easier to engineer. Platforms for Biological Design
Wed Jun 15
4:00-5:00
Pamela Silver Pamela Silver
Harvard Medical School
Dr. Pamela Silver, Professor of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School and founding member of the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University is interested in the field of Synthetic Biology. Her interests focus on the predictable and facile engineering of biological systems with applications in both human health and global sustainability. Recent work includes engineering cell-based computers, metabolic pathways for biofuel and commodity production and increased carbon dioxide fixation. Dr. Silver received her PhD from the University of California and carried out Postdoctoral work at Harvard University. She has been the recipient of many awards, grants, and serves on a number of private and public advisory boards. Most recently, she was recognized with a large award from the Department of Energy to develop electrofuels. Physics and Energetics of Molecular Systems
Wed Jun 15
2:00-3:30
Christina Smolke Christina Smolke
Stanford University
Dr. Christina Smolke is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Department of Bioengineering. Before being recruited to Stanford, she was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. Christina’s research program focuses on developing modular genetic platforms for programming information processing and control functions in living systems. She has pioneered the design and application of RNA molecules that process and transmit user-specified input signals to targeted protein outputs, thereby linking molecular computation to gene expression. These technologies are leading to transformative advances in how we interact with and program biology, providing access to otherwise inaccessible information on cellular state, and allowing sophisticated exogenous and embedded control over cellular functions. Her laboratory is applying these technologies to addressing key challenges in cellular therapeutics, targeted molecular therapies, and green biosynthesis strategies. Christina’s innovative research program has been recognized with the receipt of several awards, including the NSF CAREER Award, Beckman Young Investigator Award, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, World Technology Network Award in Biotechnology, and Technology Review’s TR35 Award. Applications of Synthetic Biology
Thurs Jun 16
2:00-3:30
Angelike Stathopoulos
Caltech
Learn By Building: Elements & Architecture
Fri Jun 17
2:00-3:30
Gurol Suel Gurol Suel
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Dr. Gurol Suel received an undergraduate degree and a Masters from the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He went on to receive his Ph.D. in Molecular Biophysics from UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Under the mentorship of Rama Ranganathan, he worked on the development and application of statistical coupling analysis of multiple sequence alignments to identify evolutionary conserved networks of residues that mediate allosteric communication in proteins. He also performed electrophysiological measurements of conformational changes taking place during the activation of the fruit fly photoreceptor rhodopsin in single cells. Upon completion of his Ph.D., he joined the newly established lab of Michael Elowitz at Caltech, where he indentified that core interactions comprising a Bacillus subtilis cellular differentiation circuit constitute an excitable system. He also determined the tunability and robustness of this excitable genetic circuit in single cell measurements and demonstrated that cell fate choice was triggered by noise. In 2006, Dr. Suel joined the faculty of the Green Center for Systems Biology and Department of Pharmacology, at UT Southwestern. His current research focuses on understanding cellular decision-making. In particular, his laboratory is investigating the relationship between the dynamics and connectivity pattern of genetic circuits and their role in multipotent differentiation. By utilizing various approaches including systems and synthetic biology his goal is to identify basic principles that underlie cellular decision-making and utilize this insight to alter or engineer novel cellular behavior. Learn By Building: Elements & Architecture
Fri Jun 17
2:00-3:30
Jeff Tabor Jeff Tabor
Rice University
Dr. Jeff Tabor is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at Rice University. He received his PhD in Molecular Biology from the University of Texas at Austin, and was an NIH postdoctoral fellow with Chris Voigt at UCSF. He has previously studied how the expression of heterologous genes can impact gene expression noise and worked with a team to engineer E. coli to function as a one and two color photographic film and a distributed edge detector. His current work involves rebuilding signal transduction networks to understand how multicellular behaviors are coordinated in biology. SB5.0 Program Team

Joe Thornton
Oregon University
Understanding the Path of Evolution
Fri Jun 17
9:30-11:30
Alice Ting Alice Ting
MIT
Dr. Alice Ting has been a professor in the MIT Department of Chemistry since 2001. Prior to that she received her undergraduate degree in chemistry from Harvard, her Ph.D. in chemistry from U. C. Berkeley (working with Peter Schultz), and she did her postdoctoral training at UCSD with Roger Tsien. Alice's awards include the NIH Director's Pioneer Award, the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award, the Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry, the Technology Review TR35 Award, and the McKnight Technological Innovations in Neuroscience Award. Next Generation Techniques
Wed Jun 15
10:00-11:30
Cole Trapnell Cole Trapnell
Broad Institute and Harvard University
Dr. Cole Trapnell is a Damon Runyon Fellow in the Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology at Harvard and the Broad Institute. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science developing software and mathematics to analyze next generation sequencing experiments such as RNA-Seq. He is the author of several popular open-source analysis tools including TopHat (http://tophat.cbcb.umd.edu) and Cufflinks (http://cufflinks.cbcb.umd.edu), which are becoming the de facto standard for aligning and assembling the billions of short reads generated with next generation RNA sequencing. These tools enable high-throughput gene discovery and expression analysis at the level of individual splice isoforms in complex transcriptomes. He was recently part of the team, which included members in the labs of Adam Arkin, Jennifer Doudna, and Lior Pachter, that developed SHAPE-Seq, an assay for probing RNA secondary structure on hundreds or thousands of RNAs in a single experiment. With John Rinn at Harvard, his research focuses on cataloging and characterizing eukaryotic long, noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and their role in cellular programming and differentiation. This large and still mysterious class of molecules constitutes a rich catalog of components for RNA engineering and regulatory network manipulation. Cole and John are investigating ways to use lncRNAs to alter cellular programming and fate. Next Generation Sequencing-Workshop
Wed Jun 15
12:00-2:00
Daisuke Umeno Daisuke Umeno
Chiba University
Dr. Daisuke Umeno is currently Associate Professor in Applied Chemistry and Biotechnology at Chiba University in Japan. After acquiring a Ph.D. in polymer science (bio-conjugate chemistry) in 1998 in the lab of Mizuo Maeda at Kyushu University, Japan, Dr. Umeno completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Frances Arnold's lab at Caltech and Larry Loeb's lab at the University of Washington, Seattle. Dr. Umeno started his own lab at Chiba University in 2005. His group's research interests are on the evolutionary design of biosynthetic pathways and regulatory circuits. Platforms for Biological Design
Wed Jun 15
4:00-5:00
Chris Voigt Chris Voigt
MIT
Dr. Christopher Voigt is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He holds a joint appointment as a Chemist Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, is an Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), and an Honorary Fellow at Imperial College. Prior to joining MIT, he received his BSE in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan (1998), a PhD in Biochemistry/ Biophysics at the California Institute of Technology (2002), performed postdoctoral work in the Bioengineering Department of the University of California – Berkeley (2003), and was a faculty member in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California – San Francisco (2003-2011). Applications of Synthetic Biology
Thurs Jun 16
2:00-3:30
Ting Wang Ting Wang
Washington University School of Medicine
Dr. Ting Wang is an assistant professor at the Genetics Department and Center for Genome Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. He has a PhD in Computational Biology. He was a Helen Hay Whitney Fellow. His research focuses on understanding genetic and epigenetic impact of transposable element on human regulatory networks and their role in human diseases. He develops algorithms for identifying regulatory motifs, and analytical and visualization methodologies to integrate genomic and epigenomic data. He is a co-inventor of the UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser and a co-investigator of the Epigenome Roadmap Mapping Centers. Genome Scale Engineering
Wed Jun 15
8:00-9:30
Aniela Wochner Aniela Wochner
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Dr. Aniela Wochner is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Philipp Holliger's group at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK. She obtained her MSc in Biochemistry from the University Bayreuth, Germany, for her thesis investigating RNAi in cancer cells at Roche Kulmbach GmbH. Having moved to Berlin, Aniela received her PhD from the Free University, working with Volker A. Erdmann on the selection of aptamers and their application in diagnostic assays. Her current research at the MRC LMB is focused on the in vitro evolution and engineering of RNA polymerase ribozymes, with the aim of recreating a modern-day equivalent of a primordial RNA replicase. What's Next? Part I
Fri Jun 17
8:00-9:00
Zhen Xie Zhen Xie
MIT
Dr. Zhen Xie is currently a Postdoctoral Associate at Computer Sciences & Artificial Intelligence Lab and Department of Biological Engineering in Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From Oct. 2006 to Jul. 2010, he worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow at FAS Center for Systems Biology in Harvard University. While working with Drs. Yaakov Benenson at Harvard and Ron Weiss at MIT, he helped to pioneer the use of RNAi-based logic circuit for manipulating mammalian cells. He holds his PH.D in Biology from University of Nevada Las Vegas. What's Next? Part I
Fri Jun 17
8:00-9:00
Tetsuya Yomo Tetsuya Yomo
Osaka University
Professor Tetsuya Yomo is a Professor of Osaka University and a Project Leader of Dynamical Micro-scale Reaction Environment Project (ERATO, JST). Prof. Yomo received his Ph.D. in Engineering from Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University in 1991. He was appointed as an Assistant Professor at Faculty of Engineering, Osaka University in 1991, then served as an Associate Professor (1998-2002) and later moved to Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University and was appointed as a Professor in 2006. He has served as a Group Leader of Kaneko Complex System Biology Project, ERATO, JST (2004-2009) and started his own project, “Yomo Dynamical Micro-scale Reaction Environment Project, ERATO, JST in 2009. He has won a number of awards including the Zuckerkandl Prize by Journal of Molecular Evolution in 2002. Main research topic of his group is complex system, experimental evolution, artificial cell, and artificial symbiosis. Currently, he is experimentally synthesizing artificial life, genetic network for cell differentiation, and symbiosis to understand fundamental rules behind biological complex systems. Lightning Talks
Wed Jun 15
5:00-6:00